The evolution of Sekimori Ishi

This sculpture was inspired by a trip to the Chicago Botanic Garden, where I saw a sekimori ishi. T was intrigued by a symbol that meant “don’t go here”, which also included a convenient handle, that that could be used to move it out of the way.

Sekimori ishi at Morton Arboretum

Sekimori ishi at Morton Arboretum


The next step was to recreate the form. I had a nice, small piece of walnut, which I grooved and drilled.

carved walnut

carved walnut

I covered the grooves with masking tape and cardboard, and taped on a sprue, then buried this in loose sand, and poured in molten aluminum.

ready for sand and molten aluminum

ready for sand and molten aluminum

The result was this. Note that it did not quite fill completely.

DSCN0494

DSCN0496

The next step was to try it in granite. It was fairly difficult to cut the grooves with a carbide wheel.

grooved granite cobble

grooved granite cobble

This was also taped, and a sprue added.

DSCN0655

This also worked fairly well. It did fill, but had a hot tear.

hot tear

hot tear


The next step was to scale up the process. This a was done with a larger piece of honey locust wood, done the same way that the walnut piece. It was accepted in a local show, where it sold.
Package

Package


I didn’t want to spend hours cutting grooves in granite, so I decided to make a foam cage around a stone. The lifting ring is based on industrial lifting rings.

foam cage and sprue

foam cage and sprue

This was invested in masking tape, and the peice was placed upside down in loose sand, and cast in aluminum.

ready to cast the maquette

ready to cast the maquette

It filled, with no hot tears.
granite and aluminum maquette

granite and aluminum maquette


I really wanted to do one in cast iron. I had been planning to go to the 7th International Conference on Contemporary Cast Iron Art, and I got a call for artists. I entered the piece above as a maquette. My proposal was accepted, but they wanted iut bigger than I had planned, and it looked like it would be impossible to cast the iron in one piece around the stone. Before I went to the conference, I did one more in aluminum, with a lifting ring only. This was carved in foam, fitted to the boulder, cast, then glued in place.

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I finally did get to make the cast iron version for Pedvale.

Sekimori Ishi

Sekimori Ishi


I would like to continue with this theme. There are a few possibilities. I have heard of obsidian boulders in Iceland, and I may try to get one. In the meantime, I am looking for a bread loaf size lump of glass to experiment with. I may just cut a slot in the stone or glass, and expoxy a lifting ring in place. The ring does not have to be cast, but could be cut from steel or titanium using a plasma cutter or a water jet.

I have found other artistic depictions of sekimori ishi. This one was done in ceramic in France.

Sekimori Ishi Modern was an exhibit in the Netherlands.

What is the meaning of Seshimori Ishi ?

My sculpture was based on the traditional Japanese sekimori ishi. Here is a photo of one in use in a Japanese garden.

Sekimori ishi at Morton Arboretum

Sekimori ishi at Morton Arboretum


I am interested in visual symbols, particularly ones that may convey multiple meanings.

Sekimori ishi means boundary guard stone. It tells you that a path is closed, but also provdes a convenient handle for moving the stone, so that you can ignore the message. It is not a “Keep Out” sign, but is more of a polite suggestion. The tea master Rikyu is said to have used it as a metaphor for “stay on the right path in life”.

This is a symbol that contains its opposite, much like Nabuo Sekine’s Mono Ha sculpture, Phase-Mother Earth at Suma Rikyu Park.

Phase-Mother Earth, reborn

http://www.nobuosekine.com/image/phase-mother-earth-1968/

The idea behind the sculpture was to include multiple opposites, in addition to this implied restriction and permission of the object itself. The boulder is natural and unworked, while the iron is man made and cast. The upright stone is male, but the rounded form with the ring is female. The boulder is positive space, the iron encloses negative space. Yin and yang. Hot iron and cold stone.

The design of the iron is based on my youth in Pittsburgh. This engraving shows my neighborhood a century before I was born. I grew up playing on coal mine dumps, and their were coal mines under my neighborhood. I got to see lots of early ironwork, some of it in the form of machinery that still worked for decades. My neighborhood was on the third hill from the river.

my nieghborhood, 1850

my nieghborhood, 1850

You can view this sculpture as my desire for you to stay on the right path. As it mimics the aesthetics of 19th and early 20th century iron, it can also mean that you should avoid the excesses of 19th century industrialization and capitalism, or not, as you wish.

Other Interpretations

Other viewers have other ideas of what the sculpture means. Possibly due to Mylie Cyrus, some view it as a wrecking ball. I deny this, and the design was started before her video. On the other hand, if you make a wrecking ball video or photo using this sculpture, please send me a copy.

wrecking ball by DonkeyHotey

Several people have seen this as a kraken, devouring the rock. Although octopi have eight tentacles, and squid have ten, I can see this visually.

kraken tattoo design by Iryne R

Uther people have suggested that this looks like an ancient anchor. Anchors are a traditional symbol of hope, so I enjoyed this idea. After the sculpture was made, I found this large buoy anchor in Latvia.

anchor

Carol Johnson has written that this reminds her of a bell. I have cast bells, although they have been much smaller than this. I would not want to try to ring it. What is the sound of one boulder ringing?

my lost bubble wrap bell

Making Sekimori Ishi at Pedvale

My plans changed a bit from the initial proposal, which was to cast iron directly around the granite.  See my previous post about cultural resource management, and choosing the stone.   I could not have completed this sculpture without the help of my assistants, Sutton Demlong and Justin Playl.  Both were highly recommended by Tamsie Ringler.

Me, the raw stone, Sutton Demlong, Justin Playl

Me, the raw stone, Sutton Demlong, Justin Playl

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Sekimori Ishi

Sekimori Ishi

This is my sculpture for the Iron Stone Symposium and the 7th International Conference on Contemporary Cast Iron Art. It is on permanent display at the Pedvale Open Air Art Museum in Pedvale, Talsu Novads, Latvia.